The Daily Feed

It’s Ballot Petition time again!

Photo courtesy of
‘Petition for Council–signatures’
courtesy of ‘Rochelle, just rochelle’

That’s right, it’s election season again. The April 3rd, 2012 primary is now officially underway (though we’ve had candidates in and out of the race already) with ballot petitions being available to suitors this morning down at the DC Board of Elections and Ethics at Judiciary Square.  Ballot petitions are required by all three (yes, three) parties in the District to be part of the primary ballot, though signature requirements are vastly different between the organizations.

The Democratic Party requires 2,000 party member signatures for the At-Large race, and 250 party member signatures for the Ward seats.  Ron Moten may be crazy like a fox, though, for jumping ship to be a “Civil Rights” Republican, as he’ll  likely be the only candidate in the Ward 7 race to do so, and he needs just 14 signatures of Republicans in Ward 7 to get on the ballot. DCist’s Martin Austermuhle is camping out at DCBOEE this morning for the pickup process, so follow his twitter for a blow-by-blow.

As of 9:15 this morning, Jacque Patterson has picked up petitions to run against Marion Barry in Ward 8, and Councilmember Muriel Bowser has picked up petitions to run for re-election in Ward 4. It’s expected that three of the four ward council members will be facing serious challenges, with Muriel Bowser facing 7 opponents, Yvette Alexander facing at least three party challengers plus Ron Moten, and Marion Barry will have at least two.  Jack Evans is so far unopposed, with his only challenger bowing out ahead of the petition deadline, suggesting harassment from the Evans camp.

The Daily Feed

CM Yvette Alexander fined $4,000 by OCF for misuse of constituent funds

Photo courtesy of
courtesy of ‘dbking’

Ward 7 Councilmember Yvette Alexander was fined $4,000 by the Office of Campaign Finance, related to the findings that “Councilmember Alexander’s Constituent Services Fund (CSF) made an expenditure for campaign activities; and that her Constituent Services Program (CSP) failed to report certain expenditures on required quarterly reports, both in violation of the D.C. Campaign Finance Reform and Conflict of Interest Act. A fine of $4,000 was imposed for these violations.”

It appears that Alexander was acquitted of responsibility for the most serious charges levied against her in the complaint, but some of the more minor charges, which include using $300 from her constituent services funds to pay for robocalls for her campaign, still cost the council member’s campaign $4,000 in fines.

Alexander joins several other members of the City Council on the wrong side of scandals this year.