Food and Drink, The Daily Feed

New Chef at Central: Jason Maddens

Photo courtesy of
‘cheeseburger @ Central, Michel Richard’
courtesy of ‘’

A little while ago, Ashley brought you the news that Michel Richard is now offering buckets of fried chicken. And now the latest news from Central is the appointment of a new executive chef, Jason Maddens.

Not entirely new to the Michel Richard empire, Maddens was previously the sous chef at Michel in Tyson’s Corner. Prior to that he worked as the executive sous chef at 2941 in Falls Church, VA.

“Jason is a wonderful young chef, with good experience in high volume restaurants.  We have been working together for several months and I am glad to have him join us at Central,” says Richard. 

My guess is that the menu will remain mostly the same (don’t worry, that fried chicken isn’t going anywhere). According to Mel Davis, the executive assistant to Richard, Maddens will work with Richard on seasonal changes to the menu.

Foodie Roundup, Life in the Capital, Special Events, The Daily Feed

Foodie Round-Up (June 15th-19th)

Photo courtesy of
‘Artomatic 2009 Kerrin’s Appetizers’
courtesy of ‘Mr. T in DC’

Good Friday Morning, Washington! How are you out there? Is that, actual, like, sun? WHAT? Here I was thinking we had turned into the Amazon. I had bought a mosquito net and everything. But just in time for a *hopefully* sunny weekend, here’s all the news fit to eat in the District this week. We’ve got the Washingtonian Best Of Washington Party, Galileo III, a Mondavi wine dinner, where to celebrate Bastille Day, and um, Asian picnics on 4th of July (what?). Read on, dear readers. Continue reading

Food and Drink, The DC 100, The Features

DC Omnivore 100: #4, Steak Tartare

Kitfo at Dukem

If the idea of marauding hordes of Tartars riding with raw meat under their saddles to tenderize it just in time for a nice snack after some pillaging sounds appetizing to you, then you’ve probably tried steak tartare. Ok, we don’t really know if that’s the origin of the dish, but that’s the historical rumor. As most cultures have their own version, who can say for sure?

So, in our continuing quest to conquer the Omnivore 100 list, we’ll explore a couple of variations.

The usual definition of a traditional steak tartare is finely chopped or diced (not sliced) raw beef marinated in wine, and served with accompaniments like capers, onions and a raw egg on top. But this classic version has long been left behind by adventurous chefs putting their own stamp on it, so that now it’s common to see steak tartare listed on menus with the only similarity across the board being the raw beef itself. Continue reading